My Top 5 Summer Reads (And Cocktail Suggestions)

So now that summer is officially upon us, some of you may be wondering, “Sara, what books do you recommend for summer reading? And what libations should I enjoy while reading these books?”

Or maybe not.

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At any rate, I can certainly make a few suggestions, whether you really wanted to know the answer to that question or not.

 

 

1.The Historian (Elizabeth Kostova)

Engrossing, complex and more than a little dark, this book makes for an absorbing read, one that certainly might make you long for a little sunshine to chase away the shadows. It has plenty of two of my favorites: history and vampires. Everyone likes vampires.

Drink suggestion: Red wine. Obviously.

rotwein flasche mit glas / red wine bottle and glass

2.  The Secret History of the Pink Carnation (Lauren Willig)

A fun combination of chick-lit and historical romance, this is the first book in a great series if you are looking for something that might be described as a “romp”. Flowery named spies in Napoleonic France? Yes, please. The Pink Carnation is just the first book in a series that is just absolute fun. Although, I have discovered since finishing this series that that description is apt for all of Lauren Willig’s books. You can’t lose.

Drink suggestion: Lemonade. Just kidding. Try a Lavender Lemon Drop. A much more fun version of the lemonade Amy insists on (sort of) with a flowery twist to tie into the books.

3. The Diviners (Libba Bray)

Set in 1920s New York with a paranormal angle, this was one of those books I just couldn’t put down. This book felt like what I wanted the 1920s to be like. Add in a cast of fascinating paranormal characters and it was just about perfect.

Drink suggestion: A Sapphire 75. This drink has gin (which just feels right for a book set during Prohibition) and Prosecco, for a little sparkle I feel is perfect for Evie’s bubbly personality.

4. The Thorn Birds (Colleen McCullough)

If its drama you’re looking for, forget crappy reality TV and grab this oldie-but-goodie. It tells the story of the Cleary family, in particular their daughter Meggie, over the course of years. Mostly set on a sheep station in Australia it has all the drama you could ask for: mean spirited plots, forbidden love, dramatic deaths! There is even a great 80s miniseries if you need more.

Drink suggestion: A Wildfire martini. Not only is this a drink with a fair amount of its own drama, but there is wildfire in the books. It had tragic results, so perhaps a nice martini might help.

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5. Beautiful Creatures (Kami Garcia and Margaret Stohl)

I know what you’re thinking: another YA series? Yes. Another. I may be in my thirties now, but many of the best books being written these days are for young adults and I’m still happy to pretend that I am one. Anyway, this whole series was one I really enjoyed reading. It was dark, Southern and full of magic. There is also a spin off series, Dangerous Creatures, if you enjoy this one. However, I can’t really recommend the movie. It was pretty awful. Although, it does have Alden Ehrenreich (a.k.a. the new Han Solo), who is pretty dreamy.

Drink suggestion: The Charleston Bog. Summery and Southern, a perfect drink to help lighten up the darker moments in the book.

This list is really just scratching the surface. What are your favorite summer books (or drinks, for that matter)? Let me know in the comments!

The Raven Cycle (Maggie Steifvater)

I’m a little ashamed to say that the first book in this series was recommended to me via Goodreads over a year and a half ago by a high school friend who is now a librarian. Normally, I try to pay more attention when people who I know appreciate books tell me to read something. I slacked off in this regard.  I recall being intrigued (the email sat in my account forever), but at some point I forgot about it.

Enter: this blog. While wracking my brain for books to add to my TBR pile, The Raven Boys, the first book in the series came back across my radar. Lucky for me, my local library’s app had the ebook, so I put a hold on it and waited. About a week later, it was all mine for 21 days. I finished it in two. It would have been less, but, sigh, the need to actually go to work and sleep got in my way.

The next day I got online and ordered not only The Raven Boys for my very own, but also the rest of the series (The Dream Thieves, Blue Lily, Lily Blue and The Raven King).

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Pictured: poorly photographed book porn

Wow.

Guys. Guys. If you have not already, you must read these books. I was floored.

Sometimes there are books that just are so enjoyable and so satisfying that it makes it difficult to function in the real world. I can give a book no higher compliment. These books fall solidly into that category.

I didn’t plan on reviewing them as a whole unit, but given that I consumed them so quickly, it just seemed right that I look at them all together.

To briefly give you an idea of the plot, Blue lives in a house full of psychics and is a girl destined to have her true love die after a kiss. Gansey, Ronan, Adam and Noah are all Raven Boys, students of the affluent private school Aglionby. Aglionby boys are trouble and Blue wants nothing to do with any of them. Reluctantly, she is drawn into their orbit and ultimately for their search for the mythical Welsh king, Glendower. All of them are much more than they seem, including Blue herself.

These books are at once lush, dark, dreamy and real. They were magical while at the same time they seemed made the impossible seem more than possible, made it seem almost normal. It was a really glorious experience. I finished The Raven King less than 30 minutes ago as I write this and I already cannot wait to read them again.

And the descriptions!! Holy moly. Unbelievable! I found myself rereading sentences more than once because I was just so amazed at their construction, at the word she used to describe objects, people, situations. She describes things in such a way that, even though they wouldn’t be the words anyone else might pick, they are exactly right. I could never have thought of it, but it was wonderfully perfect. That really helped to add to the dreamlike atmosphere.

I also loved that the romance didn’t have a complete chokehold on the whole series. As you may know, I really love my YA books, but with so many of them, the love story between the protagonists is almost cloying. With these books, that romantic connection is there, it is in fact rather key to the story, but it doesn’t overwhelm the entire plot. It compliments it, which makes it much more convincing.

The Raven Cycle truly makes an outstanding summer read. So, go read them. Read them now! What are you waiting for?

Bay of Sighs (Nora Roberts)

Allow me a moment to go all fangirl here for a moment: I. Love. Nora. Roberts.

I picked up my first Nora Robert’s books in college, and I was somewhat skeptical at the time. I ordered her Circle Trilogy with a gift card right after Christmas for next to nothing. I loved cheesy romance novels, but Nora Roberts? It was quantity, not quality, right? I was not convinced, but was willing to give her a try.

I fell in love pretty quickly. In particular I’m weak for her paranormal books. Is there a bit of a formula to them? Yeah, probably. However, there is something completely relaxing about her books for me. They are light, fun books where I can count on a happy ending.

And there is absolutely nothing wrong with that.

To that end, Bay of Sighs did not disappoint. This is the second entry in The Guardians series. Sorry to start this with the second book, but I didn’t have a blog when I read the first book.  It was good.

To summarize, six people are charged with finding three stars created by three goddesses to celebrate the rise of their queen. The first book follows the romance of Sasha and Bran, a seer and sorcerer, respectively, and the hunt for the fire star, along with Riley, Doyle, Annika and Sawyer. Long story short, they fall in love and find the star and kick the ass of the villain, Nerezza, an evil goddess trying to capture the stars, setting her back in her quest to obtain the stars for herself.  All of this is set against the back drop of Corfu, Greece.

That brings us to Bay of Sighs. This book follows the mermaid Annika and Sawyer, a traveler, who can move through time and space with the help of a magical compass, as they seek the water star.  Here, they have moved the party to Capri, providing another gorgeous location for my imagination to play with.

Sort of like what I pictured...
Sort of like what I pictured…

Annika is not my favorite character in the series. Prior to this, she just came off as naïve and simple, but there is something likeable about her unfailing optimism. She is naïve, but as a character who spent her life living in the ocean, I suppose I can forgive that.  And Sawyer is like most other male Nora characters: handsome and a good man. He also cooks, what’s not to like?

This one surprised me a little. There are often scenes in Nora’s books that could be considered dark. I’m not squeamish, really, but there was a torture scene that was a little darker than normal, but it more or less fit.

I’ve read other criticisms of this series that say it’s boring, or just follows a predictable formula. I didn’t think it was boring. There was a decent amount of action to balance the romantic elements, as well as the “planning” scenes.  As far as the formula goes, I have to admit, it doesn’t bother me. I go into any Nora Roberts’ book with certain expectations, and this fulfilled them for me. They are brain candy, comfort books for me. It’s a chance for me to shut down the parts of me that are stressing and escape.

The only negative for me, is that I can breeze through one of these books in no time. Less than two days, and I had killed this book. This now leaves months of waiting until the final book in the series, Island of Glass comes out in December. I just have to keep in mind that slightly over five months is really not that long to wait for a new book in a series.  Until then, I’ll be patient… and possibly reread the In the Garden series again (spoiler: It’s wonderful).

The Readers of Broken Wheel Recommend (Katarina Bivald)

It is seriously difficult not to enjoy a book where not only does the main protagonist share your name, but also a great number of your personality traits, but I really found this one enjoyable for other reasons/

I started this book based on a recommendation from my mother. As much as it still pains me to admit it, even now that I’m in my 30s, I usually like most of the books she suggests. Nancy and Plum, Harry Potter… let’s just say this isn’t a first.

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Sourcebooks

The story picks up with Sara Lindqvist arriving from Sweden in Iowa for a visit with her pen pal, fellow book lover Amy Harris. Her timing, as it turns out, is not great: she arrives in time for the end of Amy’s funeral. The rest of the story follows Sara and the people of Broken Wheel, Iowa as they navigate this aftermath.

I don’t want to give too much away, because I think you should just read the book. It’s worth it and was a relatively quick read. The story itself reminds me a great deal of Billie Letts (Where the Heart Is, The Honk and Holler Opening Soon, Made in America), with the sort of fish out of water scenario in a small middle American town with a cast of unusual characters and the idea of friends that become a family you build for yourself. I absolutely love Billie Letts, so I couldn’t help but find this books appealing as well. Broken Wheel didn’t have quite the same drama to it, but the similarity is there.

The only place where I think she let me down a little was that there were plenty of opportunities to flesh out the characters more. There are hints to their back stories I wish could have been explored more in depth. I know, I know. We are meant to fill in some of the details in our imagination. But all the same, there were quite a few characters and there were plenty of tantalizing allusions to their pasts, particularly in the letters from Amy to Sara. I really think that the author could have explored some of those stories a little more.

I couldn’t help but like seeing so much of myself in Sara. Name aside, she is a somewhat shy woman who takes great comfort in the mere presence of books. She feels that there is a book out there for everyone, if they don’t read it’s simply because they have not yet found the right one. That is an idea I can wholeheartedly agree with. For what little good it does me, I try to encourage reading to everyone I know. My life would certainly be far poorer without it.

At any rate, this was Katarina Bivald’s first book, so I will definitely be looking forward to others as this one was very enjoyable. Although, so far her newer books appear to only be in Swedish, a language I obviously lack proficiency in, so for now, I will eagerly await.  All in all, The Readers of Broken Wheel Recommend was a cozy sort of book that would go excellently with a warm beverage and comfy reading nook.

Throwback Thursday: Rimwalkers (Vicki Grove)

Welcome to Throwback Thursday!  This is a new thing I’m trying out where I’ll take another quick look at books I loved as a kid.  Of course, I realize that at this point anything I do here is new.  We’ll call it a tryout.

Anyway, today I’ll be taking another look back at Rimwalkers.

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Tory and her younger sister Sara are off to their grandparents farm for the summer, along with their cousin Elijah.  Shy Tory is looking forward to a summer with her projects and time with her cousin, while outgoing Sara is distraught at a summer away from her adoring friends.  Upon arrival, they are both surprised to find their rebellious cousin Oren, also joining them for the summer.

Tory, Elijah and Oren develop a close bond, while surprisingly Sara drifts away.  For them the summer will hold adventure, a ghostly mystery and ultimately, a terrible tragedy.

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To me this book has always just felt like a drowsy, golden, childhood summer to me.  It reminds me of visits from out of town cousins at my grandparents as a kid.  We never had real ghosts, be we sure wished to see them in the old, empty mill across this street.

I absolutely love it.  For me, this book has held up surprisingly well.  I can still pick it up on a hot summer day for a quick read and enjoy it just as much as ever.  I definitely suggest this for kids looking for something to read as well as any adults looking to recapture some childhood nostalgia.